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DXER Ham Radio DX News

The latest dx news/current propagation and more. Visit mike's Amateur Radio Page at www.qsl.net/swlham

Friday, March 31, 2017

Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 for Friday, March 31, 2017:

The following is a QST. Amateur radio continues its advances in digital technology. In Italy, one amateur creates a detailed online map that locates repeaters — and it’s time for an exclusive report from our roving correspondent, Pierre Pullinmyleg, who’s back to break some exclusive April Fool’s Day news! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 comes your way right now.

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Propagation Forecast Bulletin #13 de K7RA:

Solar activity rose over the past week, with average daily sunspot
numbers rising from 3.4 to 29.7 and solar flux from 71.2 to 77.9.
Average daily planetary A index increased from 10 to 18.3, and
average mid-latitude A index went from 7.1 to 13.6.

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Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 for Friday, March 31, 2017:

The following is a QST. Amateur radio continues its advances in digital technology. In Italy, one amateur creates a detailed online map that locates repeaters — and it’s time for an exclusive report from our roving correspondent, Pierre Pullinmyleg, who’s back to break some exclusive April Fool’s Day news! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 comes your way right now.

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via IFTTT

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #13 de K7RA:

Solar activity rose over the past week, with average daily sunspot
numbers rising from 3.4 to 29.7 and solar flux from 71.2 to 77.9.
Average daily planetary A index increased from 10 to 18.3, and
average mid-latitude A index went from 7.1 to 13.6.

from dx news http://ift.tt/2nURshA
via IFTTT




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via IFTTT

Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in purple) seen at the...



Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in purple) seen at the 211-angstrom wavelength (Extreme Ultraviolet, or EUV), as viewed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA).

At this wavelength, at a wavelength not seen by the un-aided eye, we observe this full-disk AIA image through the 21.1 nm (211 A) filter. This Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) waveband is used to monitor active regions in the solar corona.

The image is a ‘false color image’, meaning that observed data are in a range outside of what human eyes can see, so the data are digitally recast into colors that emphasize physically important features. This view is created from data gathered by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite that flies above Earth’s atmosphere in an inclined geosynchronous orbit.

Emissions captured in this image come from iron (Fe), a trace element in the solar atmosphere that emits Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light when heated to temperatures in excess of one million deg K. In the solar corona the temperatures are so high that most chemical elements have lost many of their electrons. Some of the remaining electrons still attached to the atom emit EUV radiation in narrow wavebands or lines.

The 21.1 nm filter (also called channel or bandpass) is dominated by emissions from highly ionized iron: 13 times ionized (missing 13 electrons) iron–Fe XIV. Other ionization levels of iron also contribute. The roman numeral descriptors are consistent with spectral notation: the level of ionization for a given roman numeral is one unit larger that the actual number of missing electrons. Additionally there may be some contribution from hot thermal plasma when solar flares are present. The temperatures associated with this level of ionization is about 2 x 10^6 K.

The bright regions in this image correspond to regions of closed magnetic field loops that trap the hot, emitting plasma. Large bright regions are often called active regions. The dark regions correspond to cooler temperatures and possibly to locations where magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, and thus, do not trap hot plasma.

With this image, we can monitore active regions.

View live data and images at http://SunSpotWatch.com

We’re on Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr



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01/04/2017 – WCA & DCI pedition of IZ1ZJO/P to Castle of Voltaggio

– Roberto IZ1ZJO/p will be active on the 1 April from Castle of Voltaggio, WCA: I-00271, DCI: DCI-AL205. Please spot him if you hear. 73



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Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 for Friday, March 31, 2017:

The following is a QST. Amateur radio continues its advances in digital technology. In Italy, one amateur creates a detailed online map that locates repeaters -- and it's time for an exclusive report from our roving correspondent, Pierre Pullinmyleg, who's back to break some exclusive April Fool's Day news! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 comes your way right now.

from dxnews http://ift.tt/2npgIbX
via IFTTT

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #13 de K7RA:

Solar activity rose over the past week, with average daily sunspot numbers rising from 3.4 to 29.7 and solar flux from 71.2 to 77.9. Average daily planetary A index increased from 10 to 18.3, and average mid-latitude A index went from 7.1 to 13.6.

from dxnews http://ift.tt/2nURshA
via IFTTT

Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 for Friday, March 31, 2017:

The following is a QST. Amateur radio continues its advances in digital technology. In Italy, one amateur creates a detailed online map that locates repeaters -- and it's time for an exclusive report from our roving correspondent, Pierre Pullinmyleg, who's back to break some exclusive April Fool's Day news! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2057 comes your way right now.

from dxnews http://ift.tt/2npgIbX
via IFTTT

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #13 de K7RA:

Solar activity rose over the past week, with average daily sunspot numbers rising from 3.4 to 29.7 and solar flux from 71.2 to 77.9. Average daily planetary A index increased from 10 to 18.3, and average mid-latitude A index went from 7.1 to 13.6.

from dxnews http://ift.tt/2nURshA
via IFTTT

Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in purple) seen at the...



Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in purple) seen at the 211-angstrom wavelength (Extreme Ultraviolet, or EUV), as viewed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA).

At this wavelength, at a wavelength not seen by the un-aided eye, we observe this full-disk AIA image through the 21.1 nm (211 A) filter. This Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) waveband is used to monitor active regions in the solar corona.

The image is a ‘false color image’, meaning that observed data are in a range outside of what human eyes can see, so the data are digitally recast into colors that emphasize physically important features. This view is created from data gathered by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite that flies above Earth’s atmosphere in an inclined geosynchronous orbit.

Emissions captured in this image come from iron (Fe), a trace element in the solar atmosphere that emits Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light when heated to temperatures in excess of one million deg K. In the solar corona the temperatures are so high that most chemical elements have lost many of their electrons. Some of the remaining electrons still attached to the atom emit EUV radiation in narrow wavebands or lines.

The 21.1 nm filter (also called channel or bandpass) is dominated by emissions from highly ionized iron: 13 times ionized (missing 13 electrons) iron–Fe XIV. Other ionization levels of iron also contribute. The roman numeral descriptors are consistent with spectral notation: the level of ionization for a given roman numeral is one unit larger that the actual number of missing electrons. Additionally there may be some contribution from hot thermal plasma when solar flares are present. The temperatures associated with this level of ionization is about 2 x 10^6 K.

The bright regions in this image correspond to regions of closed magnetic field loops that trap the hot, emitting plasma. Large bright regions are often called active regions. The dark regions correspond to cooler temperatures and possibly to locations where magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, and thus, do not trap hot plasma.

With this image, we can monitore active regions.

View live data and images at http://SunSpotWatch.com

We’re on Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr



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01/04/2017 – WCA & DCI pedition of IZ1ZJO/P to Castle of Voltaggio

– Roberto IZ1ZJO/p will be active on the 1 April from Castle of Voltaggio, WCA: I-00271, DCI: DCI-AL205. Please spot him if you hear. 73



from dxnews http://ift.tt/2nJSfl3
via IFTTT

Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in purple) seen at the...



Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in purple) seen at the 211-angstrom wavelength (Extreme Ultraviolet, or EUV), as viewed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA).

At this wavelength, at a wavelength not seen by the un-aided eye, we observe this full-disk AIA image through the 21.1 nm (211 A) filter. This Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) waveband is used to monitor active regions in the solar corona.

The image is a ‘false color image’, meaning that observed data are in a range outside of what human eyes can see, so the data are digitally recast into colors that emphasize physically important features. This view is created from data gathered by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite that flies above Earth’s atmosphere in an inclined geosynchronous orbit.

Emissions captured in this image come from iron (Fe), a trace element in the solar atmosphere that emits Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light when heated to temperatures in excess of one million deg K. In the solar corona the temperatures are so high that most chemical elements have lost many of their electrons. Some of the remaining electrons still attached to the atom emit EUV radiation in narrow wavebands or lines.

The 21.1 nm filter (also called channel or bandpass) is dominated by emissions from highly ionized iron: 13 times ionized (missing 13 electrons) iron–Fe XIV. Other ionization levels of iron also contribute. The roman numeral descriptors are consistent with spectral notation: the level of ionization for a given roman numeral is one unit larger that the actual number of missing electrons. Additionally there may be some contribution from hot thermal plasma when solar flares are present. The temperatures associated with this level of ionization is about 2 x 10^6 K.

The bright regions in this image correspond to regions of closed magnetic field loops that trap the hot, emitting plasma. Large bright regions are often called active regions. The dark regions correspond to cooler temperatures and possibly to locations where magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, and thus, do not trap hot plasma.

With this image, we can monitore active regions.

View live data and images at http://SunSpotWatch.com

We’re on Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr



from dxnews http://ift.tt/2okf9k8
via IFTTT

01/04/2017 – WCA & DCI pedition of IZ1ZJO/P to Castle of Voltaggio

– Roberto IZ1ZJO/p will be active on the 1 April from Castle of Voltaggio, WCA: I-00271, DCI: DCI-AL205. Please spot him if you hear. 73



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Midway and Kure DXCC Deleted

The news is out on the ARRL Website: KH7 and KH4 Kure and Midway DXCC Deleted. But something to me smells fishy about these deletions.

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Midway and Kure DXCC Deleted

The news is out on the ARRL Website: KH7 and KH4 Kure and Midway DXCC Deleted. But something to me smells fishy about these deletions.

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from WordPress http://ift.tt/2npd7ul
via IFTTT

01/04/2017 – WCA & DCI pedition of IZ1ZJO/P to Castle of Voltaggio

– Roberto IZ1ZJO/p will be active on the 1 April from Castle of Voltaggio, WCA: I-00271, DCI: DCI-AL205. Please spot him if you hear. 73

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01/04/2017 – WCA & DCI pedition of IZ1ZJO/P to Castle of Voltaggio

– Roberto IZ1ZJO/p will be active on the 1 April from Castle of Voltaggio, WCA: I-00271, DCI: DCI-AL205. Please spot him if you hear. 73

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Latest TEC map from NASA. What is TEC? Total Electron Content...



Latest TEC map from NASA. What is TEC? Total Electron Content (or TEC) is an important descriptive quantity for the ionosphere of the Earth. TEC is the total number of free electrons integrated between two points, along a tube of one meter squared cross section, i.e., the electron columnar number density. Affected by solar activity, Total Electron Content (TEC) describes the total number of free electrons present within one square meter between two points (i.e. between the receiver and satellite involved in measuring TEC).

These maps are also used to monitor ionospheric weather, and to nowcast ionospheric storms that often occur responding to activities in solar wind and Earth’s magnetosphere as well as thermosphere.

View live data and images at http://SunSpotWatch.com

Follow: http://ift.tt/1iWH4ta and http://ift.tt/1wJXm19

Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr

And: Check out the stunning view of our Sun in action, as seen during the last five years with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXN-MdoGM9g

We’re on Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr



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The following is the weekly propagation bulletin from W1AW /...



The following is the weekly propagation bulletin from W1AW / ARRL (posting on 20170331 22:40 UTC):

QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 13 ARLP013

From Tad Cook, K7RA Seattle, WA March 31, 2017 To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP013 ARLP013 Propagation de K7RA

Solar activity rose over the past week, with average daily sunspot numbers rising from 3.4 to 29.7 and solar flux from 71.2 to 77.9.

Average daily planetary A index increased from 10 to 18.3, and average mid-latitude A index went from 7.1 to 13.6.

Predicted solar flux is 86, 87 and 88 on March 31 til April 2, then 86, 84, 83 and 82 on April 3 to 6, 71 on April 7 to 14, 73 on April 15 to 17, 75 on April 18 to 22, 78 on April 23 to 26, 75 on April 27 to 29, 73 on April 30 to May 1 and 71 on May 2 to 11.

Predicted planetary A index is 20 on March 31 through April 2, 15 on April 3 and 4, 12 on April 5 and 6, 5 on April 7 to 16, then 24, 25 and 10 on April 17 to 19, 5 on April 20 to 22, then 25, 40, 35, 20, 18 and 12 on April 23 to 28, and 8, 16, 12, 15 and 12 on April 29 through May 3, followed by 5 on May 4 to 13 and 24 on May 14.

F.K. Janda, OK1HH sent us his geomagnetic activity forecast for the period March 31 to April 25, 2017.

‘Geomagnetic field will be: quiet on April 9 and 10, 14 to 16, 20 to 22 mostly quiet on April 6, 8, 11 quiet to unsettled April 4, 12 and 13, 19 quiet to active on April 3, 5, 7, 23, 25 active to disturbed on March 31, April 1 and 2, 17 and 18, 24

Amplifications of the solar wind from coronal holes are expected on March 31, April 1 to 4, (5 to 8,) 12 and 13, (14,) 16 to 20, 25.

Remark: - Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement and/or lower reliability of prediction.’

Tamitha Skov released a space weather video last week:

http://bit.ly/2obVYcb

Jon Jones, N0JK reported: 'Aurora contacts reported on 6 meters March 27 along the northern tier states and Canada. This was due to a G2 geomagnetic storm from coronal wind stream.’

Scott Bidstrup, TI3/W7RI sent this from Costa Rica:

'Don’t know if you’ve seen this, but a magnetic precursor event to solar flares has been discovered, that may actually lead to short-term warnings before a flare occurs.

http://ift.tt/2o37lDd

The six meter drought that everyone has been complaining about up there has been even worse for us down here in the single-digit latitudes. It’s been at least six months since I’ve logged a six meter QSO. In the wake of coronal hole passages, there have been a couple of evenings recently with some very modest TEP openings from here into Brazil and Argentina, but with only a small handful of stations heard weakly and no new stations not already worked many times. There has been no sporadic E at all for many months - not even hearing the beacons from Venezuela and French Guiana that indicate our most common openings to the east. If there is supposed to be an inverse correlation between solar activity and sporadic E, like the textbooks claim, you could have sure fooled me.

Not that there has been no sporadic E at all; indeed, there has been very frequent Sporadic E openings into South America on 10m in the daytime here, and even frequent evening TEP openings into South America on 10m as well. But the signals are about what we would normally expect on six meter openings rather than ten. MUFs from these events just aren’t getting very far into the VHF. Conventional F2 openings on ten have become very rare now.

Other propagation on the upper HF bands has been poor - the declining solar activity has taken a big toll here on the upper HF bands, with most band openings starting later in the morning than in the past, and ending earlier in the late afternoon - and signals not being particularly strong when the band is open. The only saving grace has been that our mid-day break has been shorter and weaker than at the solar maximum, so it’s often possible to hear signals and even work them at midday on 20m, which has not been possible at higher sunspot numbers. MUF has gotten high enough to open 17m on most days, but often it doesn’t quite make it to 15m. So when 15m is open, it’s often the result of a weak sporadic E event or the aftermath of a coronal hole passage. During the last solar minimum, 15m would be open most days, but so far during this one, it’s been hit and miss at best. And the solar minimum is just getting a good start.

30m has been the most reliable performer - almost always open into the States during the day and worldwide at night. Sadly, PSK activity seems to have declined on 30m, so I haven’t worked as many stations with the ragchews I dearly love, just the spartan JT9 contacts. Sure wish we had phone privileges on that band.

40m has been seeing a huge increase in QSO activity with conditions on 20m declining. There are evenings now where finding an open spot can be a bit of a problem. Most of what I hear on phone here is the States, but I am seeing a lot of eastern European DX on PSK, and my good friend, Michael, TI7XP, has worked some pretty good DX on 40m CW in recent days, including Kuwait and several stations in the Far East, and a lot of VK/ZL. The DX here is definitely improving on 40m.

60m is still not available here, and all of us here are holding our breath, waiting for a response from the FCC on the League’s petition for rulemaking, allowing 100w. activity up there on the new WARC 60m band. If it happens for the States, it would be terrific news for us - another piece of terrific ammunition in our fight to get access to 60m here. There are still no Central American countries that allow access to 60m yet. And I can’t see a good reason why not - there is almost no local commercial or government activity in that portion of the spectrum here.

80m is seeing an improvement, especially in DX as the solar activity declines. My good friend in Panama, Jay, HP3AK, is working Japan on most morning greylines, and often getting quite good reports. VK/ZL is being worked more frequently, too - often several times per week. And nighttime Old World DX is more frequently heard now than it was just a year ago. Several of my local friends report working Europe with fairly modest 80m installations. Signal levels from the States’ 75m evening ragchews have been noticeably stronger than in the past, too. Nighttime D-layer hasn’t responded as much to the rising cosmic ray flux as I would have expected by now.

Noise levels on 160m have been low enough this winter that some of the locals are getting more interested in top band. TI7XP has a new skywire loop up for that band, and has worked some good DX on it. But the summer noise season is just about here, and I don’t expect the interest will last long.

And finally, I am pleased to report that I have copied four experimental beacons on 630m from the States, and have sent the corresponding WSPR decodes to the operators, who were delighted for the reports from here. Most nights, when noise levels aren’t particularly high, I can hear at least one or two, with just a G5RV at 50 feet and an ordinary IC7200 tuned to the appropriate frequency. Enough success to demonstrate that QSOs with Central America from the States should be possible with modest stations on that band. Not much hope for 630m access here though, at least until it has become a major band in the States like it now is in Europe, so we can justify access to it here. I have checked the 2190 band, but so far, I haven’t copied anything yet.’

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL Technical Information Service at http://ift.tt/1bXLmvi. For an explanation of numbers used in this bulletin, see http://ift.tt/1bXLlHQ.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at http://ift.tt/1bXLlHS. More good information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve overseas locations are at http://ift.tt/1cYhR1b.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL bulletins are at http://ift.tt/1cYhR1d.

Sunspot numbers for March 23 through 29, 2017 were 12, 12, 11, 20, 49, 51, and 53, with a mean of 29.7. 10.7 cm flux was 72, 72.3, 74, 77.2, 82.8, 83.7, and 83.3, with a mean of 77.9. Estimated planetary A indices were 11, 6, 4, 4, 54, 28, and 21, with a mean of 18.3. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 9, 7, 3, 3, 34, 22, and 17, with a mean of 13.6.

Check out the stunning view of our Sun in action, as seen during the last five years with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXN-MdoGM9g

We’re on Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr

And, on Twitter, too:
http://ift.tt/1iWH4ta and http://ift.tt/2mByzQW



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Latest TEC map from NASA. What is TEC? Total Electron Content...



Latest TEC map from NASA. What is TEC? Total Electron Content (or TEC) is an important descriptive quantity for the ionosphere of the Earth. TEC is the total number of free electrons integrated between two points, along a tube of one meter squared cross section, i.e., the electron columnar number density. Affected by solar activity, Total Electron Content (TEC) describes the total number of free electrons present within one square meter between two points (i.e. between the receiver and satellite involved in measuring TEC).

These maps are also used to monitor ionospheric weather, and to nowcast ionospheric storms that often occur responding to activities in solar wind and Earth’s magnetosphere as well as thermosphere.

View live data and images at http://SunSpotWatch.com

Follow: http://ift.tt/1iWH4ta and http://ift.tt/1wJXm19

Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr

And: Check out the stunning view of our Sun in action, as seen during the last five years with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXN-MdoGM9g

We’re on Facebook: http://NW7US.us/swhfr



from dxnews http://ift.tt/2nUl4LX
via IFTTT

The following is the weekly propagation bulletin from W1AW /...



The following is the weekly propagation bulletin from W1AW / ARRL (posting on 20170331 22:40 UTC):

QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 13 ARLP013

From Tad Cook, K7RA Seattle, WA March 31, 2017 To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP013 ARLP013 Propagation de K7RA

Solar activity rose over the past week, with average daily sunspot numbers rising from 3.4 to 29.7 and solar flux from 71.2 to 77.9.

Average daily planetary A index increased from 10 to 18.3, and average mid-latitude A index went from 7.1 to 13.6.

Predicted solar flux is 86, 87 and 88 on March 31 til April 2, then 86, 84, 83 and 82 on April 3 to 6, 71 on April 7 to 14, 73 on April 15 to 17, 75 on April 18 to 22, 78 on April 23 to 26, 75 on April 27 to 29, 73 on April 30 to May 1 and 71 on May 2 to 11.

Predicted planetary A index is 20 on March 31 through April 2, 15 on April 3 and 4, 12 on April 5 and 6, 5 on April 7 to 16, then 24, 25 and 10 on April 17 to 19, 5 on April 20 to 22, then 25, 40, 35, 20, 18 and 12 on April 23 to 28, and 8, 16, 12, 15 and 12 on April 29 through May 3, followed by 5 on May 4 to 13 and 24 on May 14.

F.K. Janda, OK1HH sent us his geomagnetic activity forecast for the period March 31 to April 25, 2017.

‘Geomagnetic field will be: quiet on April 9 and 10, 14 to 16, 20 to 22 mostly quiet on April 6, 8, 11 quiet to unsettled April 4, 12 and 13, 19 quiet to active on April 3, 5, 7, 23, 25 active to disturbed on March 31, April 1 and 2, 17 and 18, 24

Amplifications of the solar wind from coronal holes are expected on March 31, April 1 to 4, (5 to 8,) 12 and 13, (14,) 16 to 20, 25.

Remark: - Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement and/or lower reliability of prediction.’

Tamitha Skov released a space weather video last week:

http://bit.ly/2obVYcb

Jon Jones, N0JK reported: 'Aurora contacts reported on 6 meters March 27 along the northern tier states and Canada. This was due to a G2 geomagnetic storm from coronal wind stream.’

Scott Bidstrup, TI3/W7RI sent this from Costa Rica:

'Don’t know if you’ve seen this, but a magnetic precursor event to solar flares has been discovered, that may actually lead to short-term warnings before a flare occurs.

http://ift.tt/2o37lDd

The six meter drought that everyone has been complaining about up there has been even worse for us down here in the single-digit latitudes. It’s been at least six months since I’ve logged a six meter QSO. In the wake of coronal hole passages, there have been a couple of evenings recently with some very modest TEP openings from here into Brazil and Argentina, but with only a small handful of stations heard weakly and no new stations not already worked many times. There has been no sporadic E at all for many months - not even hearing the beacons from Venezuela and French Guiana that indicate our most common openings to the east. If there is supposed to be an inverse correlation between solar activity and sporadic E, like the textbooks claim, you could have sure fooled me.

Not that there has been no sporadic E at all; indeed, there has been very frequent Sporadic E openings into South America on 10m in the daytime here, and even frequent evening TEP openings into South America on 10m as well. But the signals are about what we would normally expect on six meter openings rather than ten. MUFs from these events just aren’t getting very far into the VHF. Conventional F2 openings on ten have become very rare now.

Other propagation on the upper HF bands has been poor - the declining solar activity has taken a big toll here on the upper HF bands, with most band openings starting later in the morning than in the past, and ending earlier in the late afternoon - and signals not being particularly strong when the band is open. The only saving grace has been that our mid-day break has been shorter and weaker than at the solar maximum, so it’s often possible to hear signals and even work them at midday on 20m, which has not been possible at higher sunspot numbers. MUF has gotten high enough to open 17m on most days, but often it doesn’t quite make it to 15m. So when 15m is open, it’s often the result of a weak sporadic E event or the aftermath of a coronal hole passage. During the last solar minimum, 15m would be open most days, but so far during this one, it’s been hit and miss at best. And the solar minimum is just getting a good start.

30m has been the most reliable performer - almost always open into the States during the day and worldwide at night. Sadly, PSK activity seems to have declined on 30m, so I haven’t worked as many stations with the ragchews I dearly love, just the spartan JT9 contacts. Sure wish we had phone privileges on that band.

40m has been seeing a huge increase in QSO activity with conditions on 20m declining. There are evenings now where finding an open spot can be a bit of a problem. Most of what I hear on phone here is the States, but I am seeing a lot of eastern European DX on PSK, and my good friend, Michael, TI7XP, has worked some pretty good DX on 40m CW in recent days, including Kuwait and several stations in the Far East, and a lot of VK/ZL. The DX here is definitely improving on 40m.

60m is still not available here, and all of us here are holding our breath, waiting for a response from the FCC on the League’s petition for rulemaking, allowing 100w. activity up there on the new WARC 60m band. If it happens for the States, it would be terrific news for us - another piece of terrific ammunition in our fight to get access to 60m here. There are still no Central American countries that allow access to 60m yet. And I can’t see a good reason why not - there is almost no local commercial or government activity in that portion of the spectrum here.

80m is seeing an improvement, especially in DX as the solar activity declines. My good friend in Panama, Jay, HP3AK, is working Japan on most morning greylines, and often getting quite good reports. VK/ZL is being worked more frequently, too - often several times per week. And nighttime Old World DX is more frequently heard now than it was just a year ago. Several of my local friends report working Europe with fairly modest 80m installations. Signal levels from the States’ 75m evening ragchews have been noticeably stronger than in the past, too. Nighttime D-layer hasn’t responded as much to the rising cosmic ray flux as I would have expected by now.

Noise levels on 160m have been low enough this winter that some of the locals are getting more interested in top band. TI7XP has a new skywire loop up for that band, and has worked some good DX on it. But the summer noise season is just about here, and I don’t expect the interest will last long.

And finally, I am pleased to report that I have copied four experimental beacons on 630m from the States, and have sent the corresponding WSPR decodes to the operators, who were delighted for the reports from here. Most nights, when noise levels aren’t particularly high, I can hear at least one or two, with just a G5RV at 50 feet and an ordinary IC7200 tuned to the appropriate frequency. Enough success to demonstrate that QSOs with Central America from the States should be possible with modest stations on that band. Not much hope for 630m access here though, at least until it has become a major band in the States like it now is in Europe, so we can justify access to it here. I have checked the 2190 band, but so far, I haven’t copied anything yet.’

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL Technical Information Service at http://ift.tt/1bXLmvi. For an explanation of numbers used in this bulletin, see http://ift.tt/1bXLlHQ.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at http://ift.tt/1bXLlHS. More good information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve overseas locations are at http://ift.tt/1cYhR1b.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL bulletins are at http://ift.tt/1cYhR1d.

Sunspot numbers for March 23 through 29, 2017 were 12, 12, 11, 20, 49, 51, and 53, with a mean of 29.7. 10.7 cm flux was 72, 72.3, 74, 77.2, 82.8, 83.7, and 83.3, with a mean of 77.9. Estimated planetary A indices were 11, 6, 4, 4, 54, 28, and 21, with a mean of 18.3. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 9, 7, 3, 3, 34, 22, and 17, with a mean of 13.6.

Check out the stunning view of our Sun in action, as seen during the last five years with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXN-MdoGM9g

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Midway and Kure Islands deleted entities. From DXNews.com

Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016.

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Midway and Kure Islands deleted entities. From DXNews.com

Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016.

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Midway and Kure Islands deleted entities. From DXNews.com

Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016.

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Midway & Kure Islands – Deleted DXCC Entities

Following info (in full) posted on ARRL website Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016. This came about as an unintended consequence of action last summer by then-President Barack Obama that expanded the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to include the northwestern Hawaiian Islands west […]

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Midway and Kure Islands deleted entities. From DXNews.com

Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016.

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Midway & Kure Islands – Deleted DXCC Entities

Following info (in full) posted on ARRL website Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016. This came about as an unintended consequence of action last summer by then-President Barack Obama that expanded the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to include the northwestern Hawaiian Islands west […]

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Midway and Kure Islands are Now Deleted DXCC Entities

ARRL — Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016. This came about as an unintended consequence of action last summer by then-President Barack Obama that expanded the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to include the northwestern Hawaiian Islands west of Ni’ihau Island, making it the largest contiguous protected conservation area un…

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ARRL Receives Donation of Optimod 9300 from Orban Labs

ARRL — Orban Labs Inc. has donated an Optimod model 9300 audio-processing unit to ARRL. Popular with AM broadcasters, the 9300 increases the loudness of a station’s audio without overmodulation, through the use of sophisticated multi-band limiting and clipping. The digital processing also minimizes distortion and other unwanted side effects.The 9300 includes a fully programmable equalizer that can be …

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School Club Roundup Winter Term 2017 Scores Now Available

ARRL — Final scores from the winter term 2017 recent running of School Club Roundup (SCR) in February have already been posted online. SCR is sponsored jointly by ARRL, its Hudson Division Education Task Force, and the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club (LIMARC), with the goal of fostering Amateur Radio contacts with and among school radio clubs. LIMARC receives and checks the logs at the submissio…

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VHF/UHF/Microwave Pioneer Don Hilliard, W0PW, SK

ARRL — A pioneer on VHF, UHF, and microwave bands, and the designer of a popular Yagi model, Don Hilliard, W0PW (ex-W0EYE), of Clayton, Oklahoma, died on March 25 following a lengthy period of ill health. An ARRL member, he was 81.”Over the decades, Don made numerous contributions to the hobby and specifically in the VHF, UHF and microwave arena of Amateur Radio,” said Bill Mc Caa, K0RZ. “He was a pio…

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Midway and Kure Islands are Now Deleted DXCC Entities

ARRL — Midway and Kure Islands have been placed on the list of DXCC deleted entities, effective August 26, 2016. This came about as an unintended consequence of action last summer by then-President Barack Obama that expanded the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to include the northwestern Hawaiian Islands west of Ni’ihau Island, making it the largest contiguous protected conservation area un…

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ARRL Receives Donation of Optimod 9300 from Orban Labs

ARRL — Orban Labs Inc. has donated an Optimod model 9300 audio-processing unit to ARRL. Popular with AM broadcasters, the 9300 increases the loudness of a station’s audio without overmodulation, through the use of sophisticated multi-band limiting and clipping. The digital processing also minimizes distortion and other unwanted side effects.The 9300 includes a fully programmable equalizer that can be …

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School Club Roundup Winter Term 2017 Scores Now Available

ARRL — Final scores from the winter term 2017 recent running of School Club Roundup (SCR) in February have already been posted online. SCR is sponsored jointly by ARRL, its Hudson Division Education Task Force, and the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club (LIMARC), with the goal of fostering Amateur Radio contacts with and among school radio clubs. LIMARC receives and checks the logs at the submissio…

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VHF/UHF/Microwave Pioneer Don Hilliard, W0PW, SK

ARRL — A pioneer on VHF, UHF, and microwave bands, and the designer of a popular Yagi model, Don Hilliard, W0PW (ex-W0EYE), of Clayton, Oklahoma, died on March 25 following a lengthy period of ill health. An ARRL member, he was 81.”Over the decades, Don made numerous contributions to the hobby and specifically in the VHF, UHF and microwave arena of Amateur Radio,” said Bill Mc Caa, K0RZ. “He was a pio…

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Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in red) seen at the...



Today’s Sun (artificially-colored in red) seen at the 304-angstrom wavelength (Extreme Ultraviolet, or EUV), as viewed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA).

At this wavelength, at a wavelength not seen by the un-aided eye, we can see the Sun through the 30.4 nm (304 A) filter. This Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) waveband is used to monitor the chromosphere and lower transition region. It is useful to see plasma and filament activity, including filamet eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).

The image is a “false color image’, meaning that observed data are in a range outside of what human eyes can see, so the data are digitally recast into colors that emphasize physically important features. This view is created from data gathered by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite that flies above Earth’s atmosphere in an inclined geosynchronous orbit.

Emissions captured in this image come from helium (He), the second most abundant element in the solar atmosphere. Singly ionized Helium (He II) emits Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light when heated to temperatures of ~70,000 deg K. In the upper solar atmosphere the temperatures are so high that most chemical elements have lost many of their electrons. The remaining electron, which is still attached to the atom, emits EUV radiation in narrow wavebands or lines when it is in an excited state.

The 30.4 nm filter (also called channel or bandpass) is dominated by emissions from singly (once) ionized helium which has missing 1 electron–He II. The roman numeral descriptor is consistent with spectral notation: the level of ionization for a given roman numeral is one unit larger that the actual number of missing electrons. The temperatures associated with this level of ionization is range from 6 x 10^4 K to 8 x 10^4 K.

The bright regions in this image correspond to regions of closed magnetic field loops that trap the hot, emitting plasma. Large bright regions are often called active regions. The dark regions correspond to cooler temperatures and possibly to locations where magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, and thus, do not trap hot plasma.

View live data and images at http://SunSpotWatch.com

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Introducing the DX Buster!

After months of rigorous testing, the Amateur Radio Experimenters Group Inc is pleased to announce the beta version of our new DX Buster(tm)! is nearly ready for initial release. What is it you might ask? Well, it is designed to help you to break through pile-ups during DX Contests and DXpeditions, ensuring your signal is the […]

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Here is the current forecast discussion on space weather and...



Here is the current forecast discussion on space weather and geophysical activity, issued 2017 Mar 31 1230 UTC.

Solar Activity

24 hr Summary: Solar activity remained at very low levels. Region 2644 (N12W30, Eso/beta) remained unchanged, but did produce a few B-class flares. Region 2645 (S10E09, Eki/beta) continued to exhibited leader spot growth with moderate intermediate spot development. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed in available satellite imagery.

Forecast: Solar activity is expected to remain very low with C-class flares likely. With Region 2645 continuing to show moderate growth, a slight chance for M-class flare activity (R1-R2 Minor-Moderate) exists during the forecast period (31 Mar-02 Apr).

Energetic Particle

24 hr Summary: The greater than 2 MeV electron flux ranged from normal to high levels with a peak flux of 24,432 pfu observed at 30/1720 UTC. The greater than 10 MeV proton flux remained at background values.

Forecast: The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels, with a chance of exceeding very high levels, all three days (31 Mar-02 Apr). The greater than 10 MeV proton flux is expected to continue at background levels all three days.

Solar Wind

24 hr Summary: Solar wind parameters remained enhanced as CH HSS influence persisted. Total field strength was steady between 3 nT to 6 nT while the Bz component ranged from +4 nT to -6 nT. Solar wind speed exhibited an unsteady increase from near 600 km/s to peak speeds near 730 km/s. Phi angle orientation remained in a predominantly negative sector.

Forecast: Solar wind parameters are expected to remain enhanced as CH HSS influence continues throughout the forecast period (31 Mar-02 Apr).

Geospace

24 hr Summary: The geomagnetic field ranged from unsettled to G1 (Minor) storm levels as CH HSS influences continued.

Forecast: G1 (Minor) storm levels are expected early on day one (31 Mar) due to ongoing CH HSS effects. Conditions are then expected to be predominately unsettled to active, with a chance for isolated G1 storm levels, for the next two days (01-02 Apr) as lingering CH HSS effects persist.

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